Youth dating and violence

11 Feb

The Toolkit organizes information, resources, tips and tools drawn from the wealth of information gathered when the two service systems were convened through local collaborative projects funded by the Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) of the U. In this Toolkit, DV/SA providers will find information designed to increase their understanding of runaway and homeless youth and the network of programs and services working with them and, conversely, RHY providers will find resources on intimate partner violence and the programs and networks that provide protections and support to victims of violence.An increased understanding and dialogue between these systems at the service level can result in improved services overall.Parents should also know who their teens’ friends are and where their teens spend their time, and encourage their teens to be involved in positive activities.Parents who are concerned about their teens should not hesitate to ask for help from a school counselor, medical professional, religious leader, or other trusted adult.Sources: United States Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, National Mental Health Information Center, “What you Need to Know About Youth Violence Prevention,” 2002 [available online].

Youth are the most likely group to be victims or perpetrators of teen violence, but the results of teen violence affect everyone.This Toolkit should be viewed as an ever-developing resource for the field.As additional information, tips, tools, best practices, curricula, or other materials are identified or developed, they will be added to the Toolkit.What they have seen in an abusive home environment or experienced on the street is often repeated by the youth themselves in their own relationships.Because homeless youth have so little control over their lives, using violence in relationships may be a way of trying feel more in control.