Youth gay dating in great yarmouth

24 Mar

In the 1630s, about 7,000 out of 20,000 inhabitants of Newcastle died of plague, more than one-third of the population.

Specifically within the year 1636, it is roughly estimated with evidence held by the Society of Antiquaries that 47% of the then population of Newcastle died from the epidemic; this may also have been the most devastating loss in any British City in this period.

The phrase taking coals to Newcastle was first recorded contextually in 1538.

In the 18th century, the American entrepreneur Timothy Dexter, regarded as an eccentric, defied this idiom.

The status of city was granted to Newcastle on 3 June 1882.

commonly known as Newcastle, is a city in Tyne and Wear, North East England, 103 miles (166 km) south of Edinburgh and 277 miles (446 km) north of London on the northern bank of the River Tyne, 8.5 mi (13.7 km) from the North Sea.

The regional nickname and dialect for people from Newcastle and the surrounding area is Geordie.

In 1882, Newcastle became the seat of an Anglican diocese, with St. Newcastle's public transport system was modernised in 1901 when Newcastle Corporation Tramways electric trams were introduced to the city's streets, though these were replaced gradually by trolley buses from 1935, with the tram service finally coming to an end in 1950. Council housing began to replace inner city slums in the 1920s, and the process continued into the 1970s, along with substantial private house building and acquisitions.

Unemployment hit record heights in Newcastle during the Great Depression of the 1930s.